Photography : Landscape

“To the complaint, 'There are no people in these photographs,' I respond, There are always two people: the photographer and the viewer.” ― Ansel Adams

THE tree
THE tree

A sunburst accentuates the sculpturesque branches of the most photographed tree in the world. The Fall leaves are vibrant orange for less than a week. Nowadays this Japanese maple in a Portland Oregon garden is a must-have shot for any photographer's portfolio. Getting it angles requires setting up inches from the ground and being very delicate your tripod legs do not touch the fragile green moss.

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Salt Flat Striations at Sunrise
Salt Flat Striations at Sunrise

A rising sun makes striking lines come to life that criss-cross the Utah Salt Flats. Recent rainfall has caused the salt to form these rare popcorn-style formations (the whitest parts)' Whereas earlier water immersion created the ridges. Frequently used for landspeed records, getting a spot clean of any tire tracks meant driving about fifteen miles out on the tundra at the calculated risk of becoming stuck in mud.

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Fire & Ice
Fire & Ice

A spectacular sunset reflects off the Salt Lake and highlights small dinnerplate sized ice sheets. When the temperature drops cold enough, the surface of the salt water freezes and is then blown into piles by the wind.

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Living Deliberately
Living Deliberately

A breathtaking sunrise near Bruin Point. While taking this shot I kept thinking, "Finally I got a shot that fits that damned Thoreau quote every photographer's been throwing around." I kept saying to myself, "I'm living deliberately." Getting this shot involved sprinting through a dark forest trying to scope out the best angles in the pitch black pre-dawn.

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A Wave in the Wave
A Wave in the Wave

A spectacular sunrise at the Wave is complimented by ripples from my foot. I just love interacting with nature! The red rocks known as Navajo Sandstone are petrified sand dunes dating back about 150 million years to the Jurassic period. Getting there involves winning a rare permit through a lottery system (10 visitors daily), and a strenuous 3.5 mile hike on an unmarked trail in remote desert environment. 4 people had recently died there, and even the 2 gallons of water I brought wasn't enough.

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Siletz Bay Sunset
Siletz Bay Sunset

Remarkable rock formations outlined in silhouette by a vibrant sky. Wildfires caused the sunset to turn unique tones of orange, pink, and purple that day. It was rare and spectacular. Getting this shot involved wading out to my waste and balancing on rocks while crabs nipped away at my feet in frigid waters.

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“I remember my childhood names for grasses and secret flowers. I remember where a toad may live and what time the birds awaken in the summer -- and what trees and seasons smelled like -- how people looked and walked and smelled even. The memory of odors is very rich.” ― John Steinbeck, East of Eden